Certification

Our goal is to provide competency-based certification that will assure quality care for those affected by substance abuse. Certification offers evidence that standards of knowledge, skill, experience, and demonstration of competency have been met.

Certification is a voluntary process whereby professionals with a special interest in providing treatment to substance abusers and their families may receive recognition for their competency. The purpose is to establish professional standards which enable counselors, allied health professionals, health service providers, third party payors, employers, and the general public to recognize qualified professionals in this field.

Since the original founding, IC&RC has developed international standards and testing for the addiction professional working in the area of criminal justice.

ADACBGA is offering these Internationally recognized certification for professionals in Georgia who meet the standards for this credential.

Benefits of Certification

ADACBGA credentialing represents a level of professional achievement and a demonstrated knowledge of clinical competence and practice standards. Just as important, achieving a ADACB-GA credential demonstrates proficiency in support of quality alcohol and drug counseling and sets a standard of commitment to the profession of alcohol and drug counseling

Becoming certified as a ADACB-GA makes you a leader as well as a role model in the rehabilitation community at large and a steward for the alcohol and drug community.

Your credential reflects a deep personal commitment and sense of accountability that inspire credibility and confidence in your professional knowledge. It also shows your dedication to high standards of care with patients and peers, and as a representative of your workplace.

Three important reasons why you should become a Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC or CAADC):

Certification Benefits

For the public:

For the sponsoring organization:

For the certificants:

For employers:

Certified Alcohol & Drug Counselor Levels I & II (CADC I & II)

A Credential That Changes Lives & Your Career

“Counselors who treat people with substance use disorders do life-changing work on a daily basis. The diversity of backgrounds and types of preparation can be a strength, provided there is a common foundation from which counselors work. Workforce development is essential to the field of substance use disorder treatment.”

- U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

Created in 1981, the Certified Alcohol & Drug Counselor (CADC) is the largest credential in the field of addiction-related behavioral health care – totaling over 20,000 professionals worldwide. There are now more than 63 countries, U.S. states, and territories that offer a reciprocal CADC credential.

The CADC is recognized worldwide as the gold standard for competency in the field. It is written into U.S. state and national practice regulations and insurance legislation.

In its Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has named substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors as one of the fastest growing professions. The number of substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors across the country is expected to grow by 21 percent by 2018. The career is attractive, due to stable salaries and prospects for advancement. The government report especially mentions the value of certification: “Becoming certified is voluntary, but having certification may enhance one’s job prospects.”

The Certified Alcohol & Drug Counselor credential is the foundation for working in diverse professional settings where addiction services are provided. A thorough understanding of addiction and the latest evidence-based practices for treatment is the hallmark of a qualified professional. The Alcohol & Drug Counselor credential requires professionals to demonstrate competency through experience, education, supervision, and the passing of a rigorous examination.

Certified Advanced Alcohol & Drug Counselor (CAADC)

Advancing the Profession & Your Career

Adopted in 1999, the Certified Advanced Alcohol & Drug Counselor (CAADC) is one of the largest credentials in the field of addiction-related behavioral health care – totaling over 5,000 professionals worldwide. There are now 26 countries, U.S. states, and territories that offer a reciprocal CAADC credential.

In its Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has named substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors as one of the fastest growing professions. The number of substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors across the country is expected to grow by 21 percent by 2018. The career is attractive, due to stable salaries and prospects for advancement. The government report especially mentions the value of certification: “Becoming certified is voluntary, but having certification may enhance one’s job prospects.”

As the profession grows, the need for Certified Advanced Alcohol & Drug Counselors will keep pace. Certified Advanced Alcohol & Drug Counselors hold a Master’s degree or higher in a behavioral health field. They have a thorough understanding of not only substance use disorders but also co-occurring mental health disorders. CAADCs are expected to be able to use the latest evidence-based practice for treating both substance use disorders and co-occurring mental health disorders in tandem.

The Certified Advanced Alcohol & Drug Counselor credential requires professionals to demonstrate competency through experience, education, supervision, and the passing of a rigorous examination.

Certified Clinical Supervisor (CCS)

Guiding the Future of the Profession & Your Career

Adopted in 1992, the Certified Clinical Supervisor (CCS) is one of the fastest growing credentials in the field of addiction-related behavioral health care. There are now 40 countries, U.S. states, and territories that offer a reciprocal CCS credential.

In its Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2010-11 Edition, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has named substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors as one of the fastest growing professions. The number of substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors across the country is expected to grow by 21 percent by 2018. The career is attractive, due to stable salaries and prospects for advancement. The government report especially mentions the value of certification: “Becoming certified is voluntary, but having certification may enhance one’s job prospects.”

As more and more new counselors enter the field, the need for competent, trained, and ethical Certified Clinical Supervisors will grow significantly. An essential part of quality clinical programs, CCSs teach, coach, mentor, and evaluate practitioners to assure appropriate and effective service delivery of substance use disorder services. Effective clinical supervision is fundamental to having an effective counseling workforce.

A thorough understanding of addiction and the latest evidence-based practices for treatment is the hallmark of a qualified professional. The Certified Clinical Supervisor credential requires professionals to demonstrate competency through experience, education, supervision, and the passing of a rigorous examination.

Co-Occurring Disorders Professional (CCDP)

Care for co-occurring disorders is complex and complicated, and it requires specialized training. Substance abuse or mental health training alone doesn’t really prepare you for dealing with the interaction of both disorders, which are constantly influencing each other.

Treating co-occurring disorders is a distinctive discipline, which blends the best of mental health and substance abuse treatment into a “third technology” – and the best way to do that is to hold a co-occurring disorders credential. The Certified Co-Occurring Disorders Professional (CCDP) credential is based on the concept that co-occurring disorders are more than the sum of their parts.

A thorough understanding of co-occurring disorders and the latest evidence-based practices for treatment is the hallmark of a qualified professional. The CCDP credential requires professionals to demonstrate competency through experience, education, supervision, and the passing of a rigorous examination.

Adopted in 2007, the Co-Occurring Disorders Professional credential is among the fastest growing credentials in the field of addiction-related behavioral health care. There are now 19 countries, U.S. states, and territories that offer a reciprocal co-occurring credential.

Co-Occurring Disorders Professional Diplomate (CCDP-D)

Care for co-occurring disorders is complex and complicated, and it requires specialized training. Substance abuse or mental health training alone doesn’t really prepare you for dealing with the interaction of both disorders, which are constantly influencing each other.

Treating co-occurring disorders is a distinctive discipline, which blends the best of mental health and substance abuse treatment into a “third technology” – and the best way to do that is to hold a co-occurring disorders credential. The Co-Occurring Disorders Professional Diplomate (CCDP-D) credential is based on the concept that co-occurring disorders are more than the sum of their parts.

A thorough understanding of co-occurring disorders and the latest evidence-based practices for treatment is the hallmark of a qualified professional. The CCDP-D credential requires professionals to demonstrate competency through experience, education, supervision, and the passing of a rigorous examination.

Adopted in 2007, the Co-Occurring Disorders Professional Diplomate credential is among the fastest growing credentials in the field of addiction-related behavioral health care. There are now 19 countries, U.S. states, and territories that offer a reciprocal co-occurring credential.

Criminal Justice Addictions Professional (CCJP)

A Credential That Changes Lives & Your Career

Drug offenders account for more than one-third of the growth in state prison population since 1985. Addiction counseling with individuals in the criminal justice system is complex and complicated, and it requires specialized training. Substance abuse or mental health training alone doesn’t really prepare professionals for dealing with the interaction of addictive and criminal thinking.

In addition to addiction counseling skills and theoretical understanding, Criminal Justice Addictions Professionals (CCJP) need an understanding of the criminal justice system and criminal thought patterns. The CCJP credential requires professionals to demonstrate competency through experience, education, supervision, and the passing of a rigorous examination.

Adopted in 2002, the Certified Criminal Justice Addictions Professional is one of the fastest growing credentials in the field of addiction-related behavioral health care. There are now 27 U.S. states and territories that offer a reciprocal CCJP credential. This credential is recognized as the gold standard for competency in the field and has been endorsed by the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA).

Certified Peer Recovery Coach (CPRC)

Recovery Changes Lives

“Many recovery community organizations have established recovery community centers where educational; advocacy and sober social activities are organized. Peer recovery support services are also offered in churches and other faith based institutions, recovery homes/sober housing. “

- U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment 2008 Report

Peer recovery is experiencing rapid growth, whether it is provided by a peer recovery coach, peer recovery support specialist, or peer recovery mentor. Peer support services - advocating, mentoring, educating, and navigating systems – are becoming an important component in recovery oriented systems of care. Sharing recovery experience is deeply rooted in the addiction field, but it is a newer concept in mental health.

Inclusion of peers with practical experience on teams with degreed clinicians is increasingly being emphasized by the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) - in both addiction and mental health settings. Outcomes include decreases in morbidity and mortality, as well as empowerment of service recipients.

Credentialing provides much-needed standardization to the rapidly growing profession of peer recovery support. Becoming credentialed demonstrates competency, by having professional expertise and qualifications verified by an independent evaluator. It recognizes achievement of a standard of ethics, education, and experience necessary to provide quality recovery support services.

The Peer Recovery (CPRC) credential is designed for individuals with personal, lived experience in their own recovery from addiction, mental illness, or co-occurring substance and mental disorders.

Certification Standards

TITLE

ACADEMIC

TRAININGS

EXPERIENCE

SUPERVISION

FEES

CADC-T

GED/ high school, state accredited

300 hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions , 6 hours specifically in ethics

300 hour practicum

300 clinically supervised hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions w/ 120 of those hours in face to face supervision

$150 application

annual renewal

ICADC-I

GED/ high school, state accredited

300 hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions , 6 hours specifically in ethics

3 years, 6,000 hours

300 clinically supervised hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions w/ 120 of those hours in face to face supervision

$150 application $180 test fee

biannual renewal

40 hrs/$150.00

ICADC-II

Bachelor’s degree

300 hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions , 6 hours specifically in ethics

2 years, 4,000 hours

300 clinically supervised hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions w/ 120 of those hours in face to face supervision

$150 application $180 test fee

biannual renewal

 40 hrs/$150.00

ICAADC

Master’s or above in human services w/ a clinical application

300 hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions , 6 hours specifically in ethics

2 years, 4,000 hours

300 clinically supervised hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions w/ 120 of those hours in face to face supervision

$150 application $180 test fee

biannual renewal

40 hrs/$150.00

ICCS

Bachelor’s or above in human services, currently IC&RC credentialed

30 hours specific to the clinical supervision domains, with a minimum of 5 hours in each domain

5 years as an addiction counselor, 2 years as a supervisor

300 clinically supervised hours with a minimum of 10 hours of performance in each CS domain

$150 application $180 test fee

biannual renewal

40 hrs/$150.00

ICCJP

Bachelor’s degree

300 hours specific to the knowledge and skill base associated with the CJP domains, 6 hours specifically in ethics

2 years, 4,000 hours

300 clinically supervised hours with a minimum of 10 in each of the CJP  domains

$150 application $180 test fee

biannual renewal

40 hrs/$150.00

ICCDP

Bachelor’s degree in human services

330 hours total, 140 specific to COD, 30 to mental health, 30 to addiction, 130 hours from bachelor’s level classes, 6 must be in ethics

3 years, 6,000 hours

200 clinically supervised hours with a minimum of 20 in each of the COD performance domains

$150 application $180 test fee

biannual renewal

40 hrs/$150.00

ICCDP-D

Master’s or above in human services w/ a clinical application

300 hours total, 140 hours specific to COD, 130 hours from Master’s level classes 6 must be in ethics

1 year, 2,000 hours specific to COD work

100 clinically supervised hours, with a minimum of 10 in each of the COD performance domains

$150 application $180 test fee

biannual renewal

40 hrs/$150.00

ICPRC

GED/ high school, state accredited

100 hours in CPRC domains

500 hours in CPRC domains

100 clinically supervised hours specific to CPRC domains

$150 application $180 test fee

biannual renewal

GCADC-I

GED/ high school, state accredited

300 hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions , 6 hours specifically in ethics

3 years or 6,000 hours

 

Currently certified by a recognized national organization, with testing

 

$225 application

$95 test fee

biannual renewal

GCADC-II

Bachelor’s degree

300 hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions , 6 hours specifically in ethics

2 years or 4,000 hours

Currently certified by a recognized national organization, with testing

$225 application

$95 test fee

biannual renewal

GCADC-III

Master’s or above in human services w/ a clinical application

300 hours in the 12 Core Counseling Functions , 6 hours specifically in ethics

2 years or 4,000 hours

Currently certified by a recognized national organization, with testing

$225 application

$95 test fee

biannual renewal

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